Make Your Vessel Small

   

Thanksgiving is always about bounty, cornucopia, an overflowing with excess. Yet many of us are not feeling cornucopian these days. For some few at the top the bounty is flowing, but the rest of us are still struggling. We’re not feeling the Thanksgiving.

In the gospels Jesus tells us, “Do not worry about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, or about your body, what you will wear. . . .  Look at the birds of the air, they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, yet your heavenly father feeds them.”

Really? I’m supposed to be thankful that I have enough to eat and a shirt on my back? This sounds like basic survival! Where’s the great thanksgiving in that?

It’s the kind of response you’d expect from someone living in a culture of More. Just having enough to live isn’t enough. Life isn’t enough. Jesus says, “Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing?” In other words, “Isn’t there more to life than all the stuff we spend all our time frantically grasping for?” More things to satisfy all our hungers, more things to clothe, to adorn ourselves, our lifestyles. Jesus says, When you spend all your time trying to get all that stuff, you miss life.

We’re like the two old friends who bumped into one another on the street one day. One of them looked forlorn, almost on the verge of tears. His friend said, “What’s wrong?”
The sad fellow said, “Let me tell you. Three weeks ago, an uncle died and left me forty thousand dollars.”
“That’s a lot of money.”
“But, two weeks ago, a cousin I never even knew died, and left me eighty-five thousand free and clear.”
“Sounds like you’ve been blessed….”
“You don’t understand!” he interrupted. “Last week my great-aunt passed away. I inherited almost a quarter of a million.”
Now he was really confused. “Then, why do you look so glum?”
The man said, “This week… nothing!”

That’s what happens when we found our happiness on a kind of entitlement. This is the level of happiness, and when it drops below this—we’re not happy! So many people are there right now.

This is tough. I know first-hand. I ask myself, “Where does my happiness lie?” And I’m forced to admit that it’s based on things—even if I consider myself a person of modest means, it’s still things—and not, as Jesus says, life itself. “Is not life more than food? The body more than clothing?” Can we be happy just for daily bread, daily breath?

David Steindl-Rast, a Benedictine monk, says that abundance “is not measured by what flows in, but by what flows over. The smaller we make our vessel of need, the sooner we get the overflow we need for delight.” So keep your vessel small, easily filled to overflowing. It’s the opposite of the entitlement mentality, the opposite of the culture of More.

I wish you all a wonderful, overflowing Thanksgiving. And remember, as the German mystic Meister Eckhart said, “If the only prayer we ever make is ‘Thank you,’ it will be enough.”

9 Responses to Make Your Vessel Small
  1. Matt
    November 27, 2013 | 6:35 am

    The path is narrow and the vessel is small – strive for less, I like it! Happy Thanksgiving

  2. Jeffery B Koller
    November 27, 2013 | 8:01 am

    Thank you for this article. I’m now re-evaluating my vessel!
    God bless+

  3. Louise Hall
    November 27, 2013 | 4:59 pm

    Amen to this! Thank you for your words of wisdom. In spite of a difficult year I have much for which to be thankful. At the top of the list is my dear sister who shares your books and your blogs with me, as well as her faith and strength. Blessings to you as you share God’s love with others.

  4. Ginny Lovas
    November 27, 2013 | 9:54 pm

    My paents survived the Depression, and my Mom, in particular, never forgot this. Everything was saved, and used (like tin foil) until it fell apart. I think I went the opposite way – when I started to work, I bought – and bought – now, as I approach the remainder of my life, I am doing my best to give as much as possible away. It is just “stuff” – it becomes a great burdon on my soul. Ginny

  5. eric
    November 29, 2013 | 7:36 am

    Just got around to reading this post the day after Thanksgiving. They day before Thanksgiving I “happened” to read that passage in the Bible. Your thoughts gave me new things to meditate on…

    Oh and by the way, my family is preparing to move in order to take care of a another family member…and I do not have a job there yet. You think God is trying to tell me something??

    Thank you so much for writing this.

  6. eric
    November 29, 2013 | 7:36 am

    Just got around to reading this post the day after Thanksgiving. They day before Thanksgiving I “happened” to read that same passage in the Bible. Your thoughts gave me new things to meditate on…

    Oh, and by the way, my family is preparing to move in order to help take care of a another family member…and I do not have a job there yet. You think God is trying to tell me something??

    Thank you so much for writing this.

  7. eric
    November 29, 2013 | 7:59 am

    Was having trouble getting my post to submit…but i guess it went both times.

  8. Lisa
    November 29, 2013 | 4:07 pm

    This Thanksgiving was spent in the hospital recovering from surgery. So thankful for the smiles from the staff, the patience as they help me get up, the giving up of time with their families to take care of me…. And doing it with joy. Thank you for these wonderful people.

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